Genjuan International Haibun Contest 2020

I am delighted to be a part of this wonderful Haiku in English group that Stephen Gill runs and teaches in Kansai. I attend the Senri-Chuo meetings in Osaka. Do enter a haibun today!

Icebox

We are pleased to announce that the Genjuan International Haibun Contest 2020 will be open for submissions from Oct. 1 till Jan. 31 (arriving a couple of days late is usually OK). This year we have a new Officer, Yaeno Azuchi, and therefore a new address: 53-56 Izumigawa-cho, Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-0807, Japan. Much gratitude goes to her predecessor in Hyogo, Eiko Mori, for many years of bright, efficient service.

We also have two new Judges, both haiku poets: Akiko Takazawa & Sean O’Connor. Akiko, a disciple of Murio Suzuki (1919-2004), leads the Karinka 花林花 group and lectures on haiku at NHK Gakuen in Tokyo. She is also a fine translator of haiku, both Japanese into English and vice versa. Sean is the author of Even the Mountains – Five Years in a Japanese Village, amongst other memorable books, and has a good grasp of the Japanese view of…

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Osaka Tenjin Matsuri Festival: Opportunity to Participate In The Cosmos

I felt the world re-enchanted and a reconnection to sacred time when I was transported out of mundane time by participating in the Tenjin Matsuri Festival in Osaka July 24-25. A festival that is considered one of the top three festivals in Japan and has been held at the Temmangu Shinto Shrine for over 1,000 years, it allows young and old to cut through the one-dimensional rationality that dominates our consumer society and momentarily restore the sacred connection to the cosmos.

Mono no aware, Japanese Flowers and Living in Accord With Nature

“If I were asked to explain the Japanese spirit, I would say it is wild cherry blossoms glowing in the morning sun!”  — Motoori Norinaga (1730-1801), nativist thinker and poet One of the biggest reasons I love Japan is its cultural connection to nature. From its animistic roots in Shintoism, which came from Siberian shamans … Continue reading Mono no aware, Japanese Flowers and Living in Accord With Nature